Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Temperature Effects and Genotype-by-Environment Interactions in Hybrids: Haldane's Rule in Flour Beetles

Michael J. Wade, Norman A. Johnson and Yukihiko Toquenaga
Evolution
Vol. 53, No. 3 (Jun., 1999), pp. 855-865
DOI: 10.2307/2640725
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2640725
Page Count: 11
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($4.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Temperature Effects and Genotype-by-Environment Interactions in Hybrids: Haldane's Rule in Flour Beetles
Preview not available

Abstract

When males of the flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, are crossed to females of its close relative T. freemani, the sex ratio of the hybrids is female biased, owing in part to hybrid male mortality. Morphological abnormalities are also frequent in the surviving hybrid males, but not in the hybrid females. The finding that the heterogametic sex (male) is more adversely affected in interspecific crosses than the homogametic sex is consistent with Haldane's rule, which predicts that hybrid dysfunction should emerge as an indirect byproduct of divergent adaptation to differing environments. If so, environmental effects and genotype-by-environment interactions (GEI) should characterize the expression of Haldane's rule and interspecific hybrid traits in general. We used two wild-collected populations of T. castaneum (from Infantes, Spain, and Madagascar) to investigate the effects of environmental variation on the expression of Haldane's rule. Males from each population were mated to several T. freemani females and the half-sibling hybrid progenies were reared across a series of temperature regimes. For both populations, we found that hybrids raised at higher temperatures exhibited a more extreme expression of Haldane's rule: The hybrid sex ratios were more biased toward females and hybrid males had a much higher incidence of morphological abnormalities. The average response to temperature, the norm of reaction for Haldane's rule, varied between the two populations, and we found considerable and significant GEI for both hybrid traits within both populations. The evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed in the context of speciation arising as an indirect effect of local adaptation.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
855
    855
  • Thumbnail: Page 
856
    856
  • Thumbnail: Page 
857
    857
  • Thumbnail: Page 
858
    858
  • Thumbnail: Page 
859
    859
  • Thumbnail: Page 
860
    860
  • Thumbnail: Page 
861
    861
  • Thumbnail: Page 
862
    862
  • Thumbnail: Page 
863
    863
  • Thumbnail: Page 
864
    864
  • Thumbnail: Page 
865
    865