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Inversion Polymorphism, Longevity, and Body Size in a Natural Population of Drosophila buzzatii

Constantina Rodriguez, Juan J. Fanara and Esteban Hasson
Evolution
Vol. 53, No. 2 (Apr., 1999), pp. 612-620
DOI: 10.2307/2640797
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2640797
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Inversion Polymorphism, Longevity, and Body Size in a Natural Population of Drosophila buzzatii
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Abstract

In this study we present the results of an analysis of differential longevity associated with Drosophila buzzatii second chromosome inversion karyotypes based on the assessment of more than 1000 individuals collected in a natural population. Comparisons of inversion frequencies between emerged and bait-collected flies showed not only that inversion arrangements were associated with differential longevity, but also that selection was sex specific. Because each individual fly was scored for thorax length and karyotype, we were able to show that longevity selection favoring larger flies coupled with the average effect of inversions on thorax length can account for the change of inversion frequencies due to longevity in females. The observed genotypic-by-sex interaction could be an important mechanism involved in the maintenance of the polymorphism. Arrangement 2Jz3, which was shown to impaired fecundity in two independent previous studies, exhibited a positive effect on longevity. This pattern of negative pleiotropy may be another plausible mechanism accounting for the maintenance of the polymorphism.

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