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Convergent Evolution of Courtship Songs among Cryptic Species of the Carnea Group of Green Lacewings (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae: Chrysoperla)

Charles S. Henry, Marta Lucia Martinez Wells and Chris M. Simon
Evolution
Vol. 53, No. 4 (Aug., 1999), pp. 1165-1179
DOI: 10.2307/2640820
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2640820
Page Count: 15
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Convergent Evolution of Courtship Songs among Cryptic Species of the Carnea Group of Green Lacewings (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae: Chrysoperla)
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Abstract

Although traits of related species are likely to be similar due to common ancestry, mating signals are an exception. In singing insects, for example, song similarity has been documented only for allopatric or allochronic species pairs, and even then, not often. Where song similarity does occur, it has been logically attributed to the inheritance of ancestral traits rather than convergence. It is quite common for related, sympatric insect species to differ dramatically in calling song, which is predicted by evolutionary theory to maximize intraspecific mating success. Given that there are a limited number of ways to make sounds on anatomically similar organs and given that there would be no selective pressure for songs to differ in widely separated geographic areas, convergence in songs among related species living on different continents might be expected. Here we present the first well-documented case of such convergence, in a group of sibling, cryptic species characterized by substrate-borne vibrational mating songs. In this example from green lacewings of the carnea group of the genus Chrysoperla, a variety of statistical tests shows that one species in North America and another in Asia possess songs that are strikingly similar to each other. DNA data demonstrate that the species involved belong to divergent speciose lineages, and behavioral data demonstrate that the convergent songs are readily accepted by members of both species.

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