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Maternal Effects on Offspring Size: Variation Through Early Development of Chinook Salmon

Daniel D. Heath, Charles W. Fox and John W. Heath
Evolution
Vol. 53, No. 5 (Oct., 1999), pp. 1605-1611
DOI: 10.2307/2640906
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2640906
Page Count: 7
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Maternal Effects on Offspring Size: Variation Through Early Development of Chinook Salmon
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Abstract

We performed two breeding experiments with chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to explore maternal effects on offspring size. We estimated the magnitude of maternal effects as the differences between sire-offspring and dam-offspring regression slopes. Early in life, offspring size is largely influenced by maternal size, but this influence decreases through early development, with the maternal effect becoming negative at intermediate offspring ages (corresponding to a period of reduced growth of progeny hatching from large eggs) and converging on zero as offspring age. Also, egg size was positively correlated with early survival, but negatively correlated with maternal fecundity.

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