Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A Positive Relationship between Local Abundance and Regional Occupancy is almost Inevitable (but Not All Positive Relationships Are the Same)

Stephen Hartley
Journal of Animal Ecology
Vol. 67, No. 6 (Nov., 1998), pp. 992-994
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2647428
Page Count: 3
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Positive Relationship between Local Abundance and Regional Occupancy is almost Inevitable (but Not All Positive Relationships Are the Same)
Preview not available

Abstract

1. Recent attempts to examine the role of different mechanisms in generating a positive abundance-occupancy relationship failed to properly distinguish between Brown's (1984) sampling artefact, and the form of relationship to be expected from a random distribution of individuals. 2. Because random distributions generate a positive relationship, one can never predict that removing the influence of some or all of the mechanisms will lead to `no relationship'. 3. In considering how the spatial aggregation of individuals might influence the form of the abundance-occupancy relationship it is demonstrated that curvilinear and triangular relationships are expected, and that correlation coefficients and linear regression statistics are unlikely to be sensitive to the addition and removal of mechanisms. 4. Examining distributional data with alternative indices of spatial structure may lead to a more intuitive understanding of how different mechanisms influence the form of abundance-occupancy relationships.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
992
    992
  • Thumbnail: Page 
993
    993
  • Thumbnail: Page 
994
    994