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When the Tail Wags the Dog: Perceptions of Learning and Grade Orientation in, and by, Contemporary College Students and Faculty

Howard R. Pollio and Hall P. Beck
The Journal of Higher Education
Vol. 71, No. 1 (Jan. - Feb., 2000), pp. 84-102
DOI: 10.2307/2649283
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2649283
Page Count: 19
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When the Tail Wags the Dog: Perceptions of Learning and Grade Orientation in, and by, Contemporary College Students and Faculty
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Abstract

Three investigations assessed how concurrent emphases upon the intrinsic value of learning and the importance of grades affect college student and instructor views of themselves and of one another. Results suggest that students and instructors have compatible learning and grade orientation ideals but that current grading practices adversely affect student- instructor relations and tend to teach students that learning intellectually challenging material is not worthwhile unless it is rewarded by a grade.

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