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Systematic Affinities of Rhizophoraceae and Anisophylleaceae, and Intergeneric Relationships within Rhizophoraceae, Based on Chloroplast DNA, Nuclear Ribosomal DNA, and Morphology

Andrea E. Schwarzbach and Robert E. Ricklefs
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 87, No. 4 (Apr., 2000), pp. 547-564
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2656599
Page Count: 18
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Systematic Affinities of Rhizophoraceae and Anisophylleaceae, and Intergeneric Relationships within Rhizophoraceae, Based on Chloroplast DNA, Nuclear Ribosomal DNA, and Morphology
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Abstract

A cladistic analysis of sequences from the chloroplast gene rbcL was used to determine the systematic affinities of Rhizophoraceae and Anisophylleaceae. This analysis rejects close relationships of Rhizophoraceae with Celastraceae or Elaeocarpaceae, suggested previously, and identifies Erythroxylaceae as sister group within the Malpighiales, supported by several morphological and anatomical characters. Our molecular results also indicate that Anisophylleaceae are nested within Cucurbitales. Although this placement is novel, this affinity is also well supported by shared morphological characters. Tribal and generic relationships within Rhizophoraceae are evaluated with a combination of six molecular data sets (rbcL. atpB-rbcL intergenic spacer, trnL-trnF intergenic spacer, ITS1, ITS2, and 5.8S) and a morphological data set. These relationships are compared with results from previous morphological cladistic analyses. Against the background of the molecular results, we briefly discuss the evolution of morphological characters traditionally used for tribal subdivision as well as characters presumably significant for adaptation to mangrove habitats, namely, aerial stilt roots and vivipary.

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