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Journal Article

Heritability of Stigma Position and the Effect of Stigma-Anther Separation on Outcrossing in a Predominantly Self-Fertilizing Weed, Datura stramonium (Solanaceae)

Alexander F. Motten and Judy L. Stone
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 87, No. 3 (Mar., 2000), pp. 339-347
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2656629
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Heritability of Stigma Position and the Effect of Stigma-Anther Separation on Outcrossing in a Predominantly Self-Fertilizing Weed, Datura stramonium (Solanaceae)
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Abstract

A polymorphism for anthocyanin production was used as a genetic marker to document the relationship between antherstigma separation and outcrossing rate in the predominantly self-fertilizing weed Datura stramonium. White-flowered plants that differed in anther-stigma separation were placed into populations consisting exclusively of purple-flowered plants. Self vs. outcross origin of progeny was evident in the hypocotyl color of the seedlings. Outcrossing rates measured for single flowers were significantly positively correlated with anther-stigma separation, albeit with some scatter around the regression line, especially for flowers with exserted stigmas. We also performed an 8 x 8 diallel cross to determine whether anther-stigma separation is genetically determined. Heritability in two field plots was ∼0.3 and in the greenhouse was ∼0.2. Maternal effects, epistasis, and dominance appeared to be relatively unimportant. Genotypes performed consistently across the three environments, although total plant size varied more than fivefold. It appears that the mixed-mating system of D. stramonium has a heritable basis and would be capable of responding to selection.

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