Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Does Anthocyanin Affect Outcrossing Rates in Datura stramonium (Solanaceae)?

Judy L. Stone
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 87, No. 3 (Mar., 2000), pp. 348-354
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2656630
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Does Anthocyanin Affect Outcrossing Rates in Datura stramonium (Solanaceae)?
Preview not available

Abstract

In this paper, I investigate whether the presence or absence of anthocyanin is neutral with respect to reproduction in Datura stramonium. The observations concern the portion of the life cycle spanning pollination to germination. Pollinators do not appear to distinguish between floral morphs, as revealed by nonbiased distribution of fluorescent powder used as a pollen analogue. Pollen-tube growth is also equal for the two morphs. Seed germination is affected by the presence of anthocyanin, but apparently only by the genotype of the mother at the anthocyanin locus, and not by the genotype of the embryo itself. In addition, there was an interaction between maternal morph and the maternal source population, with seeds from high-elevation anthocyanin-producing mothers germinating most rapidly and seeds from low-elevation anthocyanin-producing mothers germinating most slowly in a common garden at low elevation. However, because germination of anthocyanin-producing and anthocyaninless progeny proceed equally quickly, the anthocyanin marker provides unbiased estimates of outcrossing rates. The results overall support the use of anthocyanin as a neutral marker, with the alternate phenotypes unlikely to be differentially impacted by the processes of pollination, pollen-tube growth, and germination. Fluctuating selection on conditions for dormancy release may be partially responsible for the maintenance of the anthocyanin polymorphism in Datura stramonium.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
348
    348
  • Thumbnail: Page 
349
    349
  • Thumbnail: Page 
350
    350
  • Thumbnail: Page 
351
    351
  • Thumbnail: Page 
352
    352
  • Thumbnail: Page 
353
    353
  • Thumbnail: Page 
354
    354