Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Spread of Sharecropping in Tuscany: The Political Economy of Transaction Costs

Rebecca Jean Emigh
American Sociological Review
Vol. 62, No. 3 (Jun., 1997), pp. 423-442
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2657314
Page Count: 20
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Spread of Sharecropping in Tuscany: The Political Economy of Transaction Costs
Preview not available

Abstract

Land tenure is central to many agricultural transformations. I examine one of these transformations, the spread of sharecropping in late medieval and early modern Tuscany. Previous research suggested that sharecropping spread as agricultural relations were refeudalized. In contrast, my analyses of fixed-term and share-term leasing (sharecropping) show that landlords used sharecropping when it lowered their overall costs of labor supervision and land management. However, to explain the spread of sharecropping, the Florentine political economy, which created particular patterns of land management costs and labor supervision costs, must also be considered. Florence was a well-developed center for urban manufacturing. Landlords were frequently urban merchants and they resided in Florence; these factors were crucial in shaping agricultural relations. Landlords' use of sharecropping to reduce the overall costs of land management and labor supervision increased as the distance from Florence-the site of landlords' principal activities-increased, as the size of farms increased, and when crops had high costs of labor supervision and land management. Thus, the use of sharecropping to lower costs associated with agricultural production must be considered in the context of the Tuscan political economy.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
423
    423
  • Thumbnail: Page 
424
    424
  • Thumbnail: Page 
425
    425
  • Thumbnail: Page 
426
    426
  • Thumbnail: Page 
427
    427
  • Thumbnail: Page 
428
    428
  • Thumbnail: Page 
429
    429
  • Thumbnail: Page 
430
    430
  • Thumbnail: Page 
431
    431
  • Thumbnail: Page 
432
    432
  • Thumbnail: Page 
433
    433
  • Thumbnail: Page 
434
    434
  • Thumbnail: Page 
435
    435
  • Thumbnail: Page 
436
    436
  • Thumbnail: Page 
437
    437
  • Thumbnail: Page 
438
    438
  • Thumbnail: Page 
439
    439
  • Thumbnail: Page 
440
    440
  • Thumbnail: Page 
441
    441
  • Thumbnail: Page 
442
    442