Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Civil Rights Liberalism and the Suppression of a Republican Political Realignment in the United States, 1972 to 1996

Clem Brooks
American Sociological Review
Vol. 65, No. 4 (Aug., 2000), pp. 483-505
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2657379
Page Count: 23
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Civil Rights Liberalism and the Suppression of a Republican Political Realignment in the United States, 1972 to 1996
Preview not available

Abstract

Arguably the most dramatic trend in U.S. public opinion during the past 30 years has been Americans' liberalizing attitudes toward the civil rights of African Americans, women, and more recently, gays and lesbians. Do these changing attitudes have any behavioral or organizational effects, or are they of little consequence for understanding social and political changes since the 1960s? While an influential strain of research has questioned the causal significance of trends in civil rights attitudes, past studies have not developed a systematic test of relevant hypotheses. This study presents such a test, analyzing the effects of trends in civil rights attitudes on an important type of behavior (presidential vote choice) and on a major type of organization (political parties). Guided by theories of issue voting and political realignment, results show that changing attitudes have had significant behavioral and organizational effects on vote choice and election outcomes since 1972. In particular, the margins of Republican presidential victories in the 1980s were suppressed by liberal trends in attitudes, while Democratic presidential victories in the 1990s depended upon these trends. These findings lead to a better understanding of the substantial but poorly understood effects of changing attitudes toward civil rights and of the widely debated scenario of a Republican political realignment.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
483
    483
  • Thumbnail: Page 
484
    484
  • Thumbnail: Page 
485
    485
  • Thumbnail: Page 
486
    486
  • Thumbnail: Page 
487
    487
  • Thumbnail: Page 
488
    488
  • Thumbnail: Page 
489
    489
  • Thumbnail: Page 
490
    490
  • Thumbnail: Page 
491
    491
  • Thumbnail: Page 
492
    492
  • Thumbnail: Page 
493
    493
  • Thumbnail: Page 
494
    494
  • Thumbnail: Page 
495
    495
  • Thumbnail: Page 
496
    496
  • Thumbnail: Page 
497
    497
  • Thumbnail: Page 
498
    498
  • Thumbnail: Page 
499
    499
  • Thumbnail: Page 
500
    500
  • Thumbnail: Page 
501
    501
  • Thumbnail: Page 
502
    502
  • Thumbnail: Page 
503
    503
  • Thumbnail: Page 
504
    504
  • Thumbnail: Page 
505
    505