Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Citizenship and Public Schools: Accounting for Racial Inequality in Education in the Pre- and Post-Disfranchisement South

Pamela Barnhouse Walters, David R. James and Holly J. McCammon
American Sociological Review
Vol. 62, No. 1 (Feb., 1997), pp. 34-52
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2657451
Page Count: 19
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Citizenship and Public Schools: Accounting for Racial Inequality in Education in the Pre- and Post-Disfranchisement South
Preview not available

Abstract

Building on the arguments that public education is a state-provided good and that citizenship rights affect groups' access to state-provided goods, we ask whether an abrupt transformation of U.S. citizenship rights-the disfranchisement of Blacks and many poor Whites in the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century South-affected the distribution of public educational opportunities and enrollments. Using county-level data for six southern states in 1890 and 1910, we find that disfranchisement changed the way local governments distributed educational opportunities to Black children and White children and produced greater racial inequalities in school enrollments. After disfranchisement, racial inequalities in educational opportunities were greatest in counties with relatively large Black populations, with relatively strong tax bases, and where the Democratic Party was least challenged. School enrollments of Blacks and Whites were limited by insufficient educational opportunities, suggesting that school expansion in the South was hindered by shortages of educational opportunities; but the limitation for Black children was significantly greater than the limitation experienced by White children.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
  • Thumbnail: Page 
39
    39
  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40
  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42
  • Thumbnail: Page 
43
    43
  • Thumbnail: Page 
44
    44
  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48
  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52