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Macroecology and Consilience

Brian A. Maurer
Global Ecology and Biogeography
Vol. 9, No. 4 (Jul., 2000), pp. 275-280
Published by: Wiley
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2665324
Page Count: 6
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Macroecology and Consilience
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Abstract

Consilience means that all fields of human knowledge should be internally consistent. Within the broad span of the ecological and evolutionary sciences, there are many fields that seem only remotely related conceptually. Macroecology has emerged as a research programme that focuses on statistical patterns of ecological and biogeographically relevant traits among different species within a taxon. The concepts needed to understand these patterns require the interface of disciplines as different as systematics, ecosystem ecology, palaeontology and community ecology. By building conceptual links among a wide range of disciplines, macroecology is contributing, and will continue to contribute, to the growing realization that all of biology is indeed consilient.

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