If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Who's Afraid of the Big, Bad Firm: The Impact of Economic Scale on Political Participation

Stan Humphries
American Journal of Political Science
Vol. 45, No. 3 (Jul., 2001), pp. 678-699
DOI: 10.2307/2669245
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2669245
Page Count: 22
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Who's Afraid of the Big, Bad Firm: The Impact of Economic Scale on Political Participation
Preview not available

Abstract

There is a considerable body of theoretical literature that argues that the nature of economic structure (e.g. the function, size, ownership, diversity, and location of firms) has a powerful effect on community politics and on social networks and norms which may affect politics. Specifically, many claim that manifestations of increasing economic scale such as larger firm size, more commuting, and less independent business ownership disrupt a community's social fabric which, in turn, results in political disengagement among community members. Despite these assertions, there have been few efforts to empirically assess the effect of economic context on mass-level political participation. This article seeks to investigate several of these propositions about the effect of economic scale. These propositions are empirically tested using a cross-level data set created by integrating the 1996 National Election Study with information about each respondent's community economic context collected from various sources. These analyses reveal that, contrary to many contemporary claims, retail size, retail density, and independent ownership have little effect on political participation. Commuting, however, does have a strong effect on political participation, but it is the aggregate level of commuting within one's community that apparently matters more than one's own commuting status.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
678
    678
  • Thumbnail: Page 
679
    679
  • Thumbnail: Page 
680
    680
  • Thumbnail: Page 
681
    681
  • Thumbnail: Page 
682
    682
  • Thumbnail: Page 
683
    683
  • Thumbnail: Page 
684
    684
  • Thumbnail: Page 
685
    685
  • Thumbnail: Page 
686
    686
  • Thumbnail: Page 
687
    687
  • Thumbnail: Page 
688
    688
  • Thumbnail: Page 
689
    689
  • Thumbnail: Page 
690
    690
  • Thumbnail: Page 
691
    691
  • Thumbnail: Page 
692
    692
  • Thumbnail: Page 
693
    693
  • Thumbnail: Page 
694
    694
  • Thumbnail: Page 
695
    695
  • Thumbnail: Page 
696
    696
  • Thumbnail: Page 
697
    697
  • Thumbnail: Page 
698
    698
  • Thumbnail: Page 
699
    699