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Induced Abortion in Urban Nepal

Shyam Thapa and Saraswati M. Padhye
International Family Planning Perspectives
Vol. 27, No. 3 (Sep., 2001), pp. 144-147+151
Published by: Guttmacher Institute
DOI: 10.2307/2673836
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2673836
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Induced Abortion in Urban Nepal
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Abstract

Context: Most of what is known about women seeking pregnancy termination in Nepal has been learned from women admitted to hospitals with abortion-related complications. Little is known about women who obtain "safe" abortions from trained providers. Methods: Social and demographic information was collected from women seeking induced abortions from a private clinic in Nepal's capital city of Kathmandu. These data were analyzed and compared to data from two other sources. Results: Thirty-six percent of the women were between 25 and 29 years of age, and 43% had two living children. Forty percent had more than a high school education, 91% were from Kathmandu and 48% practiced contraception. The primary motivation for seeking abortion for 34% of the women was the desire for no more children. Women in urban areas who had ever had an induced abortion tended to be younger, of lower parity and more educated than those in rural areas. Conclusions: Women in Nepal desire a small family size, especially those living in urban areas. Although significant numbers of women practice contraception, induced abortion is also used, primarily to control family size and for birthspacing. Increased promotion and use of contraceptive methods are needed to decrease the number of abortions, especially those that are high-risk and unsafe.

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