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Inflation and the Poor

William Easterly and Stanley Fischer
Journal of Money, Credit and Banking
Vol. 33, No. 2, Part 1 (May, 2001), pp. 160-178
DOI: 10.2307/2673879
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2673879
Page Count: 19
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Inflation and the Poor
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Abstract

Using polling data for 31,869 households in thirty-eight countries and allowing for country effects, we show that the poor are more likely than the rich to mention inflation as a top national concern. This result survives several robustness checks. We also find direct measures of improvements in well-being of the poor-the change in their share in national income, the percent decline in poverty, and the percent change in the real minimum wage-to be negatively correlated with inflation in pooled cross-country samples.

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