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Journal Article

Quantitative Graphics in Statistics: A Brief History

James R. Beniger and Dorothy L. Robyn
The American Statistician
Vol. 32, No. 1 (Feb., 1978), pp. 1-11
DOI: 10.2307/2683467
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2683467
Page Count: 11
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Quantitative Graphics in Statistics: A Brief History
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Abstract

Quantitative graphics have been central to the development of science, and statistical graphics date from the earliest attempts to analyze data. Many familiar forms, including bivariate plots, statistical maps, bar charts, and coordinate paper, were used in the 18th century. Statistical graphics developed through attention to four problems: spatial organization (17th and 18th centuries), discrete comparison (18th and early 19th centuries), continuous distribution (19th century), and multivariate distribution and correlation (late 19th and early 20th centuries). Today, statistical graphics appear to be reemerging as an important analytic tool, with recent innovations exploiting computer graphics and related technologies.

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