Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Spatial and Multivariate Analysis, Random Sampling Error, and Analytical Noise: Empirical Bayesian Methods at Teotihuacan, Mexico

Ian G. Robertson
American Antiquity
Vol. 64, No. 1 (Jan., 1999), pp. 137-152
DOI: 10.2307/2694350
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2694350
Page Count: 16
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($9.95)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Spatial and Multivariate Analysis, Random Sampling Error, and Analytical Noise: Empirical Bayesian Methods at Teotihuacan, Mexico
Preview not available

Abstract

Methods of empirical Bayesian statistical inference can help archaeologists deal with problems inherent in variably-sized and, particularly, small artifact samples. The desirability of systematically controlling random effects of sampling error when mapping estimates of artifact type proportions is emphasized in this paper and concrete examples are provided using ceramic data from the Central Mexican city of Teotihuacan. A Bayesian approach also may be beneficial for pretreating data destined for other kinds of quantitative analysis, such as exploratory multivariate analysis. Correspondence analysis using observed proportions of different types of pottery in assemblages pertaining to the Xolalpan and Metepec phases produces vague results that suggest little in the way of interpretable structure. However, a parallel analysis using posterior estimates of proportions reveals meaningful associations of ceramic categories that appear to relate to more general dimensions of behavioral variability.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
137
    137
  • Thumbnail: Page 
138
    138
  • Thumbnail: Page 
139
    139
  • Thumbnail: Page 
140
    140
  • Thumbnail: Page 
141
    141
  • Thumbnail: Page 
142
    142
  • Thumbnail: Page 
143
    143
  • Thumbnail: Page 
144
    144
  • Thumbnail: Page 
145
    145
  • Thumbnail: Page 
146
    146
  • Thumbnail: Page 
147
    147
  • Thumbnail: Page 
148
    148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
149
    149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
150
    150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
152
    152