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Rocks, Hard Places, and the New Protectionism: Textile Trade Policy Choices in the United States and Japan

H. Richard Friman
International Organization
Vol. 42, No. 4 (Autumn, 1988), pp. 689-723
Published by: The MIT Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2706645
Page Count: 35
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Rocks, Hard Places, and the New Protectionism: Textile Trade Policy Choices in the United States and Japan
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Abstract

Why have advanced industrial countries responded with different types of protectionist policy to postwar international competition and the resulting societal pressure for state action? In contrast to the across-the-board tariff wars of the 1930s, postwar protectionism is a patchwork of tariffs, unilateral and nonunilateral quotas, administrative restrictions, state subsidies, and production cartels. Arguments based on international economic structure, international regimes, statist approaches, and domestic structure all appear to have difficulty in accounting for divergent trade policy choices. This article introduces a more nuanced identification and integration of the international and domestic sources of the new protectionism. An examination of textile trade policy in the United States and Japan reveals that when state policy makers face conflicting international constraints and domestic pressur over the use of overt types of protectionist policy, the greater the domestic pressure, the more overt the policy response.

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