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Journal Article

Ecological Association of Bird Species and Habitats in Eastern Australia; Similarity Analysis

Jiro Kikkawa
Journal of Animal Ecology
Vol. 37, No. 1 (Feb., 1968), pp. 143-165
DOI: 10.2307/2716
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2716
Page Count: 31
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Ecological Association of Bird Species and Habitats in Eastern Australia; Similarity Analysis
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Abstract

In order to assess the applicability of the structural classification of vegetation to the description of avian habitats in eastern Australia, species lists (presence and absence) of birds were subjected to similarity analysis using centroid sorting with the information statistic as its coefficient. A total of 182 species from forty-eight sites in the breeding season and 128 species from twenty-one sites in the non-breeding season in northern New South Wales, and eighty species from fifteen sites in wet lowlands of North Queensland were analysed. Twenty-three plant formations and subformations were represented in the sample sites. An empirical examination of site-groups, species-groups, and site/species coincidences derived from the analysis detected some probable `misclassification' which, however, did not affect the overall pattern of ecologically acceptable classification. Regardless of the locality and season, within New South Wales, there was a general agreement of species composition between structurally similar plant formations, but the habitat-system derived from the analysis did not agree between the seasons in New South Wales or between North Queensland and New South Wales. The ecological response of the fauna was considered responsible for the east-west (mesic-xeric) distribution in New South Wales, whereas the zoogeographical factors were considered important in the north-south distribution within wet formations.

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