Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Late Postclassic Eastern Frontier of Mesoamerica: Cultural Innovation Along the Periphery [and Comments and Replies]

John W. Fox, Marie Charlotte Arnauld, Wendy Ashmore, Marshall Joseph Becker, Gordon Brotherston, Lyle Campbell, William J. Folan, John S. Henderson, Nedenia C. Kennedy, Robert J. Sharer, Payson D. Sheets and John Weeks
Current Anthropology
Vol. 22, No. 4 (Aug., 1981), pp. 321-346
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2742225
Page Count: 26
  • Get Access
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Late Postclassic Eastern Frontier of Mesoamerica: Cultural Innovation Along the Periphery [and Comments and Replies]
Preview not available

Abstract

A far-reaching frontier culture area emerged along the eastern periphery of southern Mesoamerica during the Late Postclassic. Here linguistically diverse peoples (e.g., Rabinal, Pokom, Akahal, Xinca) shared a pattern in material culture. With the frontier commencing along the borders of the Quinche and Cakchiquel conquest states, it is theorized that a principal variable in the development of the frontier cultural pattern was militaristic expansionism. Ethnohistory chronicles that the Quiche and Chakchiquel displaced Pokom and Akahal peoples, who in turn displaced others. Migrations into these borderlands from the Epiclassic onward had established a frontier cultural base that was reformulated under the pressures generated by Late Postclassic expansions. Adaptation to militaristic pressures is suggested by sites demonstrating linear regression in various indexes of political centralization/militarization. Proximity to conquest states is more signifant than ethnicity in predicting the values of these indexes. Additional variables, such as trade and population growth/local ecology, are assessed for their contribution to the formation of a distinctive frontier pattern.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
321
    321
  • Thumbnail: Page 
322
    322
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[323]
    [323]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
324
    324
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[325]
    [325]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
326
    326
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[327]
    [327]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
328
    328
  • Thumbnail: Page 
329
    329
  • Thumbnail: Page 
330
    330
  • Thumbnail: Page 
331
    331
  • Thumbnail: Page 
332
    332
  • Thumbnail: Page 
333
    333
  • Thumbnail: Page 
334
    334
  • Thumbnail: Page 
335
    335
  • Thumbnail: Page 
336
    336
  • Thumbnail: Page 
337
    337
  • Thumbnail: Page 
338
    338
  • Thumbnail: Page 
339
    339
  • Thumbnail: Page 
340
    340
  • Thumbnail: Page 
341
    341
  • Thumbnail: Page 
342
    342
  • Thumbnail: Page 
343
    343
  • Thumbnail: Page 
344
    344
  • Thumbnail: Page 
345
    345
  • Thumbnail: Page 
346
    346