Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Ramapithecus and Hominid Origins [and Comments and Reply]

Milford H. Wolpoff, L. De Bonis, John G. Fleagle, David W. Frayer, Leonard O. Greenfield, Kenneth H. Jacobs, R. Protsch, G. Philip Rightmire, Vincent Sarich, Jeffrey H. Schwartz, Ian Tattersall, Michael J. Walker, Adrienne L. Zihlman and Jerold M. Lowenstein
Current Anthropology
Vol. 23, No. 5 (Oct., 1982), pp. 501-522
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2742391
Page Count: 22
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ramapithecus and Hominid Origins [and Comments and Reply]
Preview not available

Abstract

The importance of Ramapithecus has traditionally been in the claim that it represents the earliest hominid. It is argued here that the development of Ramapithecus interpretations has been dependent upon the currently accepted theory of hominid origins. In turn, theories of hominid origins have been influenced by the emerging understanding of the ramapithecine adaptive radiation. Recent evidence strongly suggests an ancestry for Pongo among the ramapithecines, and it is suggested that the earliest hominids as well as the African apes also evolved from a ramapithecine species. The origin of the hominids is viewed as a speciation event in a late African ramapithecine species, and it is hypothesized that competition between the early hominids and the emerging African apes resulted in divergence and character displacement in both lineages. The realization of hominization in this latest ramapithecine, combined with the numerous primitive characteristics of the earliest hominids, helps bridge the gap between humans and their predivergence ancestors. The resulting interpretation of the ramapithecines preserves many of the earlier claims about their phylogenetic significance.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
501
    501
  • Thumbnail: Page 
502
    502
  • Thumbnail: Page 
503
    503
  • Thumbnail: Page 
504
    504
  • Thumbnail: Page 
505
    505
  • Thumbnail: Page 
506
    506
  • Thumbnail: Page 
507
    507
  • Thumbnail: Page 
508
    508
  • Thumbnail: Page 
509
    509
  • Thumbnail: Page 
510
    510
  • Thumbnail: Page 
511
    511
  • Thumbnail: Page 
512
    512
  • Thumbnail: Page 
513
    513
  • Thumbnail: Page 
514
    514
  • Thumbnail: Page 
515
    515
  • Thumbnail: Page 
516
    516
  • Thumbnail: Page 
517
    517
  • Thumbnail: Page 
518
    518
  • Thumbnail: Page 
519
    519
  • Thumbnail: Page 
520
    520
  • Thumbnail: Page 
521
    521
  • Thumbnail: Page 
522
    522