Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Newscasts and the Social Actuary

Julie A. Blackman, Harvey A. Hornstein, Charles Divine, Mary O'Neill, Janice Steil and Lyle Tucker
The Public Opinion Quarterly
Vol. 41, No. 3 (Autumn, 1977), pp. 295-313
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2748568
Page Count: 19
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Cite this Item
Newscasts and the Social Actuary
Preview not available

Abstract

The central concern in this article is with the ways in which good and bad news impact upon people's willingness to help strangers, their descriptions of human nature, and their perceptions of others and of themselves. This research suggests that, as people receive information about the actions of others, their views of the social universe and their estimates about human nature are constantly being influenced. That these informational influences seem to alter people's behavioral choices and their psychological perspectives lends these findings their particular significance for journalists and for others interested in the effects of media messages.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[295]
    [295]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
296
    296
  • Thumbnail: Page 
297
    297
  • Thumbnail: Page 
298
    298
  • Thumbnail: Page 
299
    299
  • Thumbnail: Page 
300
    300
  • Thumbnail: Page 
301
    301
  • Thumbnail: Page 
302
    302
  • Thumbnail: Page 
303
    303
  • Thumbnail: Page 
304
    304
  • Thumbnail: Page 
305
    305
  • Thumbnail: Page 
306
    306
  • Thumbnail: Page 
307
    307
  • Thumbnail: Page 
308
    308
  • Thumbnail: Page 
309
    309
  • Thumbnail: Page 
310
    310
  • Thumbnail: Page 
311
    311
  • Thumbnail: Page 
312
    312
  • Thumbnail: Page 
313
    313