If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Strong Arguments and Weak Evidence: The Open/Closed Questioning Controversy of the 1940s

Jean M. Converse
The Public Opinion Quarterly
Vol. 48, No. 1 (Spring, 1984), pp. 267-282
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2748623
Page Count: 16
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Strong Arguments and Weak Evidence: The Open/Closed Questioning Controversy of the 1940s
Preview not available

Abstract

The debate on open/closed survey questioning and interviewing took shape in an organizational competition between groups of commercial and academic researchers working in the federal government during World War II. The controversy hardened differences between pollsters and certain academic social scientists without bringing experimental evidence to bear on the issues. Open questioning has yielded over the years to the dominance of closed questioning, in response to in-house experience with questions and the relentless rise in survey costs, not from methodological research of any scope. The questioning controversy, shaped in good part by ideologies about research, has remained largely untouched by research.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[267]
    [267]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
268
    268
  • Thumbnail: Page 
269
    269
  • Thumbnail: Page 
270
    270
  • Thumbnail: Page 
271
    271
  • Thumbnail: Page 
272
    272
  • Thumbnail: Page 
273
    273
  • Thumbnail: Page 
274
    274
  • Thumbnail: Page 
275
    275
  • Thumbnail: Page 
276
    276
  • Thumbnail: Page 
277
    277
  • Thumbnail: Page 
278
    278
  • Thumbnail: Page 
279
    279
  • Thumbnail: Page 
280
    280
  • Thumbnail: Page 
281
    281
  • Thumbnail: Page 
282
    282