Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The Real Cost of Growth in Oregon

Eben V. Fodor
Population and Environment
Vol. 18, No. 4 (Mar., 1997), pp. 373-388
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27503533
Page Count: 16
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
The Real Cost of Growth in Oregon
Preview not available

Abstract

The costs of growth are little known, poorly understood and typically understated. This study is an initial effort to provide a more complete understanding of the current costs of growth in Oregon. While more than two dozen cost areas are identified, the focus is on basic physical infrastructure required for urban development. A "proportionate share" costing method is used to determine the public infrastructure costs associated with the construction of a typical single-family house. Each increment of growth is allocated costs for only the increment of system capacity required to serve it. Cost figures are from representative projects recently completed or underway in Oregon. The result is a composite of recent cost data selected to be representative of the state as a whole. An analysis of seven public infrastructure cost areas associated with the construction of a typical single-family house--including public facilities for schools, sewer, storm drainage, roads, water service, parks and recreation, and fire protection--shows that the total cost is about $24,500 per house. Oregon's development impact fees are recovering only a fraction of these costs. As a result, most of these public infrastructure costs are distributed across the entire population of a community through property taxes or general obligation bonds, whereas the benefits of these investments accrue primarily to the new development. The methodology used in this study can be easily replicated and may provide a useful tool for communities trying to obtain better information about the economic and fiscal impacts of urban growth. A review of relevant literature and references are provided.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
373
    373
  • Thumbnail: Page 
374
    374
  • Thumbnail: Page 
375
    375
  • Thumbnail: Page 
376
    376
  • Thumbnail: Page 
377
    377
  • Thumbnail: Page 
378
    378
  • Thumbnail: Page 
379
    379
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[380]
    [380]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
381
    381
  • Thumbnail: Page 
382
    382
  • Thumbnail: Page 
383
    383
  • Thumbnail: Page 
384
    384
  • Thumbnail: Page 
385
    385
  • Thumbnail: Page 
386
    386
  • Thumbnail: Page 
387
    387
  • Thumbnail: Page 
388
    388