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Local Solidarity

Dan Egonsson
Ethical Theory and Moral Practice
Vol. 2, No. 2 (Jun., 1999), pp. 149-163
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27504082
Page Count: 15
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Local Solidarity
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Abstract

In this article I am particularly interested in the question of solidarity within the boundaries of one's own country. I discuss a qualified beneficence requirement, which claims that we ought to prevent something very bad from happening if it is in our power and if we can do it without sacrificing anything morally significant. I also discuss a fair-share principle, according to which, in Liam B. Murphy's version, "the sacrifice each agent is required to make is limited to the level of sacrifice that would be optimal if the situation were one of full compliance". I argue that the qualified beneficence requirement is reasonable only in the proximity of the one who needs help. When there is no proximity we ought to be guided by a fair-share principle. I also that there is an intimate relation between the fair-share principle and the welfare-state ideology.

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