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Religion and Aging

C. Margaret Hall
Journal of Religion and Health
Vol. 24, No. 1 (Spring, 1985), pp. 70-78
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27505808
Page Count: 9
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Religion and Aging
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Abstract

Life history data and cultural values are used to suggest ways in which personal and social beliefs influence the quality of experiences of aging. Central questions are the extent to which an individual can select beliefs that lead to a longer, more meaningful life and the special influence that religion may have in enhancing aging. Responsiveness to needs of the elderly is a necessary component of enlightened planning for the future. Secularization and industrialization have diminished roles and expectations for the elderly. Religion may be an effective means to identify these concerns and improve the quality of life of older people.

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