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Cancer Fatalism: Spiritual Perspectives

Barbara D. Powe
Journal of Religion and Health
Vol. 36, No. 2 (Jun., 1997), pp. 135-144
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27511118
Page Count: 10
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Cancer Fatalism: Spiritual Perspectives
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Abstract

Cancer fatalism is a deterrent to participation in cancer screening. Cancer fatalism represents a surrender of the human spirit to perceptions of hopelessness, powerlessness, worthlessness, and social despair. In contrast, spirituality enhances hope and coping abilities. This correlational pilot study investigated the relationship between cancer fatalism and spirituality among rural, elderly individuals. This knowledge may provide insight into ways to negate the influence of cancer fatalism. The majority of the sample were African-American and female. A prevailing sense of fatalism and spirituality existed. However, the relationship was not statistically significant. Philosophical implications and areas for future research are explored.

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