Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

Journal Article

Religion and Cardiovascular Disease Risk

Kate L. Lapane, Thomas M. Lasater, Catherine Allan and Richard A. Carleton
Journal of Religion and Health
Vol. 36, No. 2 (Jun., 1997), pp. 155-163
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27511120
Page Count: 9
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Religion and Cardiovascular Disease Risk
Preview not available

Abstract

Objectives: To determine whether cardiovascular-disease risk-factor profiles of majority-church members differ from those of non-church members we examined a large population-based random sample. Methods: Data from the two cross-sectional surveys of the Pawtucket Heart Health Program conducted in 1981-82 (n = 2442) and 1983-84 (n = 2799) were evaluated. Trained interviewers collected physiological measures including height, weight, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and a small blood sample (for total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein). Smoking, exercise, sociodemographics, and church membership were determined by self-report. Results: Church members were older, more likely to be female, Portuguese, married, have more people living in their households, and were also more likely to be greater than 20% over-weight. Forty-eight percent of church members reported never having smoked cigarettes compared to 35.4% of non-church members. Differences in systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol were attributable to age, sex, and ethnicity. Conclusions: Aside from cigarette-smoking status and body-mass index, the risk profile of the two groups was not different, indicating that health-promotion interventions geared to the general population may not need to be tailored too extensively for members of religious organizations based on health status. On the other hand, the demographic differences and easy access to entire families may require more attention.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
156
    156
  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157
  • Thumbnail: Page 
158
    158
  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159
  • Thumbnail: Page 
160
    160
  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161
  • Thumbnail: Page 
162
    162
  • Thumbnail: Page 
163
    163