Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Effects of a Mental Hygiene Course on Graduate Education Students' Attitudes and Opinions Concerning Mental Illness

Frank Costin and William D. Kerr
The Journal of Educational Research
Vol. 60, No. 1 (Sep., 1966), pp. 35-40
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27531794
Page Count: 6
  • Download ($45.00)
  • Cite this Item
Effects of a Mental Hygiene Course on Graduate Education Students' Attitudes and Opinions Concerning Mental Illness
Preview not available

Abstract

The Opinions About Mental Illness Scale was administered at the beginning and end of the semester to five classes in "Mental Hygiene for Teachers" (70 men, 80 women) and to five control classes in education (74 men, 71 women). Four attitudes and one opinion factor were measured: Authoritarianism, Benevolence, Mental Hygiene Ideology, Social Restrictiveness, and Interpersonal Etiology. Analysis of covariance revealed that compared with control groups: (a) mental hygiene women become significantly less authoritarian (p<.05); (b) mental hygiene men and women made significantly greater increases (<.01) in the opinion that unhealthy interpersonal relationships early in life contribute to mental illness. Changes were not significantly correlated with age (p>.05), and were similar to those discovered in a previous study of abnormal psychology students.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[35]
    [35]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
  • Thumbnail: Page 
39
    39
  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40