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Teaching Method Effectiveness in Relation to Certain Student Characteristics

Barbara A. Doty
The Journal of Educational Research
Vol. 60, No. 8 (Apr., 1967), pp. 363-365
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27531888
Page Count: 3
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Teaching Method Effectiveness in Relation to Certain Student Characteristics
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Abstract

The effectiveness of three teaching methods (conventional lectures and class discussion, small-group discussion, and taped lectures) was investigated in relation to five student characteristics: cumulative grade-point average, creativity, achievement needs, social need, and attitude toward teaching method. Subjects were 300 college undergraduates. The instructional material was a unit in physiological psychology. Significant positive coefficients of correlation were obtained between scores on an achievement test, over the instructional material, and social need under conventional lecture and small-group discussion methods. Social need was found to be significantly negatively related to achievement under the taped lecture method. Achievement was found to be positively related to creativity only for the small-group discussion method. Findings suggest that teaching method effectiveness varies considerably as a function of certain student characteristics.

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