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A Comparative Study of Conventional and Programmed Instruction in Bookkeeping

William E. Gibbs, Donald L. Hunt and William F. Fahrner
The Journal of Educational Research
Vol. 61, No. 7 (Mar., 1968), pp. 320-323
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27532067
Page Count: 4
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A Comparative Study of Conventional and Programmed Instruction in Bookkeeping
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Abstract

A total of 107 high-school bookkeeping students were divided into an experimental group and a control group. The groups were evenly matched in terms of I.Q. and pre-test scores. The students in the control group were taught in the traditional manner using conventional instructional materials. The students in the experimental group were taught by means of programmed instructional materials. Both groups were then given three identical posttests. The scores of the experimental group were significantly greater on all three tests at the < .025, < .001, and < .001 levels. The experimental group also experienced a reduction in learning time of 43 percent. The study indicates that the use of programmed materials can individualize instruction in the classroom and can also be used effectively as homework.

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