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Effect of Preference for Assigned Lecture Notes on Student Achievement

Linda Ferrill Annis
The Journal of Educational Research
Vol. 74, No. 3 (Jan. - Feb., 1981), pp. 179-182
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27539811
Page Count: 4
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Effect of Preference for Assigned Lecture Notes on Student Achievement
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Abstract

College students were assigned to either take their own personal notes or to use full or partial notes that had been distributed to them while listening to a lecture in order to determine the effect of using a preferred or nonpreferred lecture note method on multiplechoice and essay test scores and on post-lecture note preference. The use of personal or partial notes resulted in higher scores on the essay test and students preferring personal or partial notes scored better on the multiple-choice exam suggesting the importance of personally encoding notes. Partial notes preference was most popular both before and after the lecture.

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