Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Identifying Intellectually Superior Black Children

Judith S. Ryan
The Journal of Educational Research
Vol. 76, No. 3 (Jan. - Feb., 1983), pp. 153-156
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27539961
Page Count: 4
  • Download ($45.00)
  • Cite this Item
Identifying Intellectually Superior Black Children
Preview not available

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of several widely used methods of identifying intellectually superior black children. In the first phase, 25 public elementary schools were screened using four methods: teacher nomination, peer nomination, pupil product, and the Goodenough Draw-A-Man. In the second phase, 49 black children were individually tested using the Stanford-Binet and Leiter International Performance Scale. Intellectual superiority was arbitrarily defined as an IQ of 120 and above on either the Binet or the Leiter. Twenty-five of the 49 children tested were found to be intellectually superior. The findings of this study suggest that less widely used methods of identification, such as parent description and the Leiter scale, may be more effective in identifying intellectually superior black children than the more traditional methods such as teacher nomination, the Goodenough Draw-A-Man, or the Stanford-Binet.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[153]
    [153]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
154
    154
  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
156
    156