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Cognitive Morality and Cheating Behavior in Religious and Secular School Children

Joseph Guttmann
The Journal of Educational Research
Vol. 77, No. 4 (Mar. - Apr., 1984), pp. 249-254
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27540053
Page Count: 6
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Cognitive Morality and Cheating Behavior in Religious and Secular School Children
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Abstract

Sixth-grade pupils from secular public (N = 68) and religious public (N = 57) schools were compared with regard to cognitive morality and actual moral behavior. The results show that the religious subjects exhibited a higher level of moral reasoning than the secular group and tended to resist temptation more on a paper and pencil test, but less on a test of actual cheating behavior. The results also show low correlation among the various measures of moral cognition and moral behavior.

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