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Can Teachers Be Trained to Make Clear Presentations?

Kim K. Metcalf and Donald R. Cruickshank
The Journal of Educational Research
Vol. 85, No. 2 (Nov. - Dec., 1991), pp. 107-116
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27540461
Page Count: 10
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Can Teachers Be Trained to Make Clear Presentations?
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Abstract

The present study examined whether (a) preservice teachers can be trained to be clearer in their instructional presentations, (b) trained teachers produce greater student learning, and (c) trained teachers produce greater learner satisfaction. Preservice teachers (N = 73) enrolled in an educational methods course were assigned to treatment in a modified Solomon Four Group Design. Experimental group teachers received 8 weeks of training in the use of 17 behaviors that students believe make instruction clearer. Before and after training, the subjects taught short lessons while being videotaped, and their learners completed tests of content and rated their satisfaction with the teaching. Analyses indicated that training affected significant improvements in teachers' clarity and ability to produce student learning. However, significant effects on learner satisfaction were not found.

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