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Effects of Self-Directed Learning, Story Comprehension, and Self-Questioning in Kindergarten

Rivka Glaubman, Hananyah Glaubman and Lea Ofir
The Journal of Educational Research
Vol. 90, No. 6 (Jul. - Aug., 1997), pp. 361-374
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27542118
Page Count: 14
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Effects of Self-Directed Learning, Story Comprehension, and Self-Questioning in Kindergarten
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Abstract

The effects of children's questioning at the kindergarten level were investigated. Two theory-based intervention methods—active processing and metacognitive—and a conventional control group were used to facilitate questioning. Theory-based intervention was expected to enhance achievements in the quality of questioning, story comprehension, and self-directed learning in both short- and long-term testing; also, the metacognitive results were expected to surpass those of active processing. Ninety-three children from 7 kindergartens were randomly assigned to the above 3 groups. Theory-based training was more efficacious, and the metacognitive-based method was superior to the active processing method, especially in generating quality and in self-directed learning.

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