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Impact of Recess on Classroom Behavior: Group Effects and Individual Differences

Olga S. Jarrett, Darlene M. Maxwell, Carrie Dickerson, Pamela Hoge, Gwen Davies and Amy Yetley
The Journal of Educational Research
Vol. 92, No. 2 (Nov. - Dec., 1998), pp. 121-126
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27542199
Page Count: 6
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Impact of Recess on Classroom Behavior: Group Effects and Individual Differences
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Abstract

The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of a recess break on classroom behavior, specifically working, fidgeting, and listlessness. A southern urban school district with a policy against recess granted permission for 2 Grade 4 classes to have recess once a week so that subsequent behavior on recess and nonrecess days could be compared. A multivariate analysis of variance with repeated measures and subsequent analyses of variance indicated that the 43 children, who were used as their own controls, differed on recess and nonrecess days, becoming more on task and less fidgety when they had recess. Sixty percent of the children, including all 5 of those with attention deficit disorder, and a balance of boys and girls benefited considerably. They worked more or fidgeted less (or both) on recess days.

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