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Teacher Effectiveness and Learning for Mastery

Joseph G. R. Martinez and Nancy C. Martinez
The Journal of Educational Research
Vol. 92, No. 5 (May - Jun., 1999), pp. 279-285
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27542223
Page Count: 7
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Teacher Effectiveness and Learning for Mastery
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Abstract

The effect of an excellent or master teacher's use of learning for mastery (LFM) procedures on student learning was examined. Although LFM research strongly supports a procedural effect, close scrutiny suggests a possible teacher-effect/procedural-effect confounding. The authors extended previous research reporting a main effect for mastery learning when the teacher was rated average, but no main effect for an excellent or master teacher. Performance in 2 mastery and 2 traditional classes of intermediate algebra, taught by a master teacher, was compared. Findings from a 2 × 2 randomized factorial design that controlled for repeatable or mastery testing, the LFM procedure, and pretesting indicated that student achievement on a final examination did not differ across mastery and control classes; however, instructor time was more than double in the mastery classes.

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