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James Wilson and the Creation of the Presidency

Daniel J. McCarthy
Presidential Studies Quarterly
Vol. 17, No. 4, The Constitutional Framers and the Modern Presidency (Fall, 1987), pp. 689-696
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27550478
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
James Wilson and the Creation of the Presidency
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Abstract

James Wilson was one of the most important delegates to the Constitutional Convention in 1787, and was probably the single most important author of Article II, which concerns the executive branch. While many Americans feared the establishment of a strong executive, Wilson argued that a strong, democratically selected President was necessary to a vibrant, virtuous republic. Such an executive was needed for good administration, and regular elections would serve to keep him from becoming a tyrant, but in addition, popular election of the President would increase the "patriotic passion" of the people.

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