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Journal Article

Teaching Revolution: Issues in Interdisciplinary Education

Judith Barisonzi and Michael Thorn
College Teaching
Vol. 51, No. 1 (Winter, 2003), pp. 5-8
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27559119
Page Count: 4
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Teaching Revolution: Issues in Interdisciplinary Education
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Abstract

One question of interdisciplinary education is how to encourage students to draw connections between disciplines and to engage in critical thinking. The authors developed a team-taught interdisciplinary course examining the history and literature of modern revolutions. The first time the course was given, students had difficulty making interdisciplinary connections and did not critically re-examine their assumptions. The authors restructured the course, re-thinking its emphasis, procedures, texts, and assignments, with substantial positive results. They also learned that teachers need to reassess their own ideology and teaching strategies to make interdisciplinary education effective.

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