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Journal Article

Patterns of Genetic Variation and Demography of Cycas taitungensis in Taiwan

Shong Huang, Hui-Ting Hsieh, Kang Fang and Yu-Chung Chiang
Botanical Review
Vol. 70, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 2004), pp. 86-92
Published by: Springer on behalf of New York Botanical Garden Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27571179
Page Count: 7
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Patterns of Genetic Variation and Demography of Cycas taitungensis in Taiwan
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Abstract

Cycas taitungensis Shen, Hill, Tsou & Chen is an endemic species remaining in two remnant populations in southeastern Taiwan. Ecological studies showed that the sex ratio between female and male of the main population is approximately 1.7:1. Leaf production was found to be correlated with tree height before reaching 1 m in length (r=0.95). The annual reproduction rate of female plants is highly variable, with seed numbering between 80 and 400 in each tree. The site study revealed a significant difference in vegetative growth and age structure between the subpopulations collected in two opposite microhabitats. Genetic studies using isozyme analysis showed low genetic variability (HE = 0.039) and little genetic differentiation between the populations (FST = 0.051). The genetic data are well correlated with the ecological observation that the differences reflect various microhabitat effects within a very local environment and that the impact influenced the extent of the degree of genetic differentiation within local populations. This work presents extensive genetic information for C. taitungensis that give rise to more ecological and genetic insights into the plant for better establishment of in situ and ex situ conservation programs.

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