Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Amour courtois, société masculine et figures du pouvoir

Christiane Marchello-Nizia
Annales. Histoire, Sciences Sociales
36e Année, No. 6 (Nov. - Dec., 1981), pp. 969-982
Published by: EHESS
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27581377
Page Count: 14
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Amour courtois, société masculine et figures du pouvoir
Preview not available

Abstract

Several features which characterize courtly love have remained enigmatic until the present time. This study suggests an interpretation which would permit taking this factor into account. The analysis concerns that category of courtly love which unites a young bachelor knight with a married woman of noble status: Tristan and Yseut, Lancelot and Guenevere are the perfect models. A comparison of the tales in verse of the late 12th century with the written prose version of a half-century later reveal a striking change: the passion which connects the lovers is nevertheless mediated, and always by a masculine figure. The author thus suggests that this type of adulterous courtly love can be seen as the displacement, the figurative expression of a still more transgressive love, of a relationship of homosexual seduction connecting the young knight and the master. This hypothesis, which does not run counter to the interpretations of G. Duby and E. Köhler, takes into consideration the complexity of relationships of opposition or of affection which could bend men together in feudal society.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
969
    969
  • Thumbnail: Page 
970
    970
  • Thumbnail: Page 
971
    971
  • Thumbnail: Page 
972
    972
  • Thumbnail: Page 
973
    973
  • Thumbnail: Page 
974
    974
  • Thumbnail: Page 
975
    975
  • Thumbnail: Page 
976
    976
  • Thumbnail: Page 
977
    977
  • Thumbnail: Page 
978
    978
  • Thumbnail: Page 
979
    979
  • Thumbnail: Page 
980
    980
  • Thumbnail: Page 
981
    981
  • Thumbnail: Page 
982
    982