Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Relative Efficiency of Fecal versus Regurgitated Samples for Assessing Diet and the Deleterious Effects of a Tartar Emetic on Migratory Birds

Jay D. Carlisle and Rebecca L. Holberton
Journal of Field Ornithology
Vol. 77, No. 2 (Spring, 2006), pp. 126-135
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Association of Field Ornithologists
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27639314
Page Count: 10
  • Get Access
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Relative Efficiency of Fecal versus Regurgitated Samples for Assessing Diet and the Deleterious Effects of a Tartar Emetic on Migratory Birds
Preview not available

Abstract

We describe the deleterious effects of using an antimony potassium tarrate emetic to obtain diet samples from birds, and compare information obtained from regurgitated samples versus fecal samples in describing diets of autumn migrants. We also examined dose effectiveness in captive Dark-eyed Juncos (Juncohyemalis) subjected to the same emetic technique used in the field. Over 70% of migrants given an emetic at a study site in Idaho regurgitated useful samples. For 5 of 7 species analyzed, regurgitated samples produced significantly more arthropods per sample than fecal samples, and one species, Warbling Vireo, showed higher numbers of distinct arthropod taxa per sample. In most species, regurgitated samples accumulated arthropod taxa more quickly than fecal samples. However, increasing the number of fecal samples by 5-17 produced a similar number of taxa. Diet composition based on fecal versus regurgitated samples was generally similar, but there were significant differences. Two of 130 treated migrants died soon after treatment. Recapture frequency for treated birds was less than half that for untreated birds, but it is not clear whether this difference was due to treatment-related mortality or emigration. Each treated bird that we recaptured had lost mass and this suggests a deleterious effect because untreated migrants tended to gain mass. In captivity, 18 Dark-eyed Juncos were treated with emetic: 6 with the full mass-specific recommended dose, 6 with half the recommended dose, and the final 6 with one quarter the recommended dose. All were alive 15-20 min posttreatment (recommended release time), but 17 of 18 died within 30 min after receiving the emetic. Together, our data suggest that although the emetic technique may be slightly more information-rich in assessing diet, it is more harmful than previously reported especially in certain species and should be used only after adequate consideration of the immediate mortality and short-term physiological effects on birds to be studied. /// Describimos efectos dañinos del uso del emético tartrato de potasio para obtener muestras de la dieta de aves silvestres (en Idaho) y cautivas (en Mississippi). Además comparamos la información obtenida de muestras vomitadas versus muestras fecales con respecto a la dieta de migratorios otoñales. También examinamos la efectividad de la dosis del emético usado en el campo, en un grupo cautivo de individuos de Junco hyemalis. En Idaho, el 70% de los migratorios expuestos al emético produjeron regurgitaciones útiles para ser estudiadas. En cinco de siete especies, las muestras regurgitadas expusieron un número mayor de artrópodos por muestra que las muestras fecales. Una de las especies, Vireo gilvus mostró además un mayor número de grupos de insectos por muestra que los otros. En la mayoría de las especies las regurgitaciones mostraron una mayor acumulación en el número de especies de artrópodos que las heces fecales. Sin embargo, si se incrementaba el número de muestras de heces fecales entre 5-17 muestras, estas ofrecían resultados similares a las regurgitaciones. A tales efectos, la composición de la dieta de aves utilizando regurgitaciones versus muestras en heces fecales resultó similar pero con algunas diferencias significativas. Dos de las 130 aves tratadas murieron poco después de darles el emético. La frecuencia de captura de las aves tratadas fue sólo la mitad con respecto a aves que no fueron tratadas; aunque no podemos decir que los resultados fueron el efecto de mortalidad por el emético o de los movimientos migratorios de las aves. Sin embargo, cada ave recapturada que había sido tratada con el emérico, resultó con perdida de peso, lo que sugiere un efecto detrimental, dado el caso de que las aves se derienen en ellugar estudiado a alimentarse y a ganar peso. En cautiverio se trataron a 18 Juncos, con el vomitivo. Seis con la dosis recomendada, seis con la mitad de la dosis y seis con un cuarto de esta. Todos sobre vivieronel periodo de 15-20 minutos, recomendado previo a liberar a las aves tratadas. Sin embargo, a los 30 minutos, 17 de las aves habían muerto. Los daros que recopilamos sugieren que el uso del emético puede ofrecer un poco más de información sobre la dieta de aves que el análisis de heces fecales, pero que es más dañino que previamente informado, particularmente para algunas especies. El método del vomitivo debe ser utilizado solamente luego de considerar el efecto fisiológico y la mortalidad que pudiera causarle a las aves a estudiarse.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
126
    126
  • Thumbnail: Page 
127
    127
  • Thumbnail: Page 
128
    128
  • Thumbnail: Page 
129
    129
  • Thumbnail: Page 
130
    130
  • Thumbnail: Page 
131
    131
  • Thumbnail: Page 
132
    132
  • Thumbnail: Page 
133
    133
  • Thumbnail: Page 
134
    134
  • Thumbnail: Page 
135
    135