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Religion

Arthur E. Holt
American Journal of Sociology
Vol. 34, No. 6 (May, 1929), pp. 1116-1128
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2765899
Page Count: 13
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Religion
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Abstract

Diversity and decentralization are the notable characteristics of American religious life. Freedom for marginal groups to develop in accordance with their own genius more to be cherished than any kind of standardization. The United States Census of 1926 shows both processes-increasing diversity and increasing centralization-at work. There are new sects not appearing before; there is a growth of the larger denominations, which are absorbing some of the smaller ones. Both processes are to encouraged. The largest growth in numbers is in the South, a condition to be attributed to the advantage which a religious group has where the population is homogeneous and the birth-rate fairly high. An increasing religious group consciousness an increasing participation of religious groups in social action characterized this last year.

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