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Women, Religion, and the Discourses of Legal Ideology in Niger Republic

Ousseina Alidou and Hassana Alidou
Africa Today
Vol. 54, No. 3, Muslim West Africa in the Age of Neoliberalism (Spring, 2008), pp. 21-36
Published by: Indiana University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27666906
Page Count: 16
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Women, Religion, and the Discourses of Legal Ideology in Niger Republic
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Abstract

There is an international movement that advocates the establishment of quotas for women, especially in political and governmental positions. Partly as a result of its initiatives and efforts, countries have introduced legislation that endorses its spirit. These efforts have been important in addressing the gender gap; however, the means of articulating these legislative measures and implementing them vary from country to another. This article focuses on the textual formulation of the Quota Bill (2001) in Niger and how secularist and Islamist political elite women responded to it during the debate that led to its legal adoption.

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