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Social Disorganization and Individual Disorganization

Herbert Blumer
American Journal of Sociology
Vol. 42, No. 6 (May, 1937), pp. 871-877
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2767808
Page Count: 7
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Social Disorganization and Individual Disorganization
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Abstract

The psychiatric contributions seem to present the following composite position: (1) social disorganization is an extension of individual disorganization; (2) it is unconsciously motivated; (3) it is a product of unfortunate childhood experiences; and (4) its elimination requires an effective sheme of childhood education. Much social disorganization cannot be thought of as arising out of individual disorder. Individual disorded seems to gain its opportunity for expression where social disorganization prevails. The problem as to how social disorganization emanates in individual disorder is uncharted. Its solution depends upon fuller knowledge of the psychology of shared values and of semi-unwitting social rhythms.

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