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Social Change and Isolation in the Ozark Mountain Region of Missouri

Walter O. Cralle
American Journal of Sociology
Vol. 41, No. 4 (Jan., 1936), pp. 435-446
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2768954
Page Count: 12
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Social Change and Isolation in the Ozark Mountain Region of Missouri
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Abstract

Fiction regularly depicts the culture of the Ozarks as strikingly different from that of the rest of the United States, while chamber of commerce literature, seeking to dispel this "hill-billy" stereotype, presents the picture of a highly developed rural civilization similar to the most favored parts of the United States. The Ozark mountain region of Missouri is an area in transition in which an archaic rural American culture, protected until recently by relative isolation, is rapidly giving ground before the impact of urban civilization introduced by the automobile and improved highway, the newspaper, the radio, and other agencies. The rate of change is closely correlated with accessibility. Agencies of communication and transportation are more important than density of population, wealth, or ethnic stock in influencing the rate of change.

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