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George Frederick Holmes and the Genesis of American Sociology

Harvey Wish
American Journal of Sociology
Vol. 46, No. 5 (Mar., 1941), pp. 698-707
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2769229
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
George Frederick Holmes and the Genesis of American Sociology
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Abstract

G. F. Holmes, a Virginian, was the most original theorist among those ante-bellum proslavery writers who attempted to create a "sociology" sanctioning a paternalistic slave system along Aristotelian lines and directly opposed to nineteenth-century liberalism. An early, if hostile, critic of both Comte's positivism and Spencer's individualism, he later summarized his position in a pioneer textbook, The Science of Society, which appeared in 1883, simultaneously with Ward's Dynamic Sociology.

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