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Education Reform and Education Politics in Japan

Hidenori Fujita
The American Sociologist
Vol. 31, No. 3 (Fall, 2000), pp. 42-57
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27698962
Page Count: 16
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Education Reform and Education Politics in Japan
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Abstract

Since the 1980s, a new tide of education reform movements has emerged in many countries, including the United States and Japan, along with the rise of a consumer orientation and national concern over the quality of schooling. This has made parental choice into a major policy issue, along with accountability and independent control. Four forms of symbiosis are identified: embracive, segregated, civic and market-oriented. This article discusses the nature of current reforms, and argues that they place Japanese education at a threefold critical crossroads or in a state of crisis.

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